I. Intervals

II. Scale Degrees

III. Scales and Keys

IV. Modes

V. Intro to Modulations

VI. Modulations of Aeolian and Ionian

VII. Other Modulations and Ethnic Scales

VIII. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 12 Tone Scales

 

 

Part II: Scale Degrees

The lesson on scales and keys is actually next, but in order to understand the terminology that is often associated with scales, it is important that we cover this topic. Since you already understand what a scale is, this should be a fairly easy concept to grasp. Each scale degree has a name. The following example used the scale in the key of C Major. Each scale degree is represented by a capital Roman numeral (lower case if it is minor Ė see section IV for information on minor scales and other modes). If you do not understand the explanation up to this point, donít worry about rereading it, the chart below should put everything into perspective.

 

Roman Numeral

Note in C Major Scale

Degree Name

I

C

Tonic

II

D

Super Tonic

III

E

Mediant

IV

F

Sub Dominant

V

G

Dominant

VI

A

Submediant

VII

B

Leading Tone